Steven B. https://stevenbreuls.com Awesome projects with guides blog! Wed, 23 Oct 2019 12:35:53 +0100 en-US hourly 1 53315385 Arcade Cabinet – Installing Emulators & Games https://stevenbreuls.com/2019/09/arcade-cabinet-installing-emulators-games/ https://stevenbreuls.com/2019/09/arcade-cabinet-installing-emulators-games/#respond Sat, 07 Sep 2019 21:04:11 +0000 https://stevenbreuls.com/?p=6721 This is the last part of the DIY Arcade cabinet tutorial series. In this guide, I will show the overall steps to add an emulator. Since there are many different emulators, I cannot write a guide for every emulator. instead, I will show the default steps you should do when adding an emulator to your […]

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This is the last part of the DIY Arcade cabinet tutorial series. In this guide, I will show the overall steps to add an emulator. Since there are many different emulators, I cannot write a guide for every emulator. instead, I will show the default steps you should do when adding an emulator to your system.

DIY Arcade Guides
Introduction & Design
Building the Cabinet
Building the Control Panel
Installing & Wiring Cabinet Electronics
Setup Hyperspin & Controllers
Installing Emulators & Games
Photo Album

 

This arcade cabinet is still a work in progress, the guides are not done yet, updates coming soon.

I highly recommend using “Bolt-on” packs that can be downloaded on the internet, these packs contain everything from artwork, roms, emulator… and should work with minimal setup work. You could build your own collection but that would take ages when someone else already did the work. A great place to find “bolt-on” packs is ArcadePhunks.com Downloads Page.

Disclaimer: None of the files are hosted on this website nor did I ever create, upload or distribute a bolt-on pack on any website.

Folders

Each system requires the following files, the %SystemName% should be replaced with the name of the console you will be adding

  • Database
    • %SystemName%.xml – List of all Rom files with some extra information (Release date, Developer…)
  • Emulators
    • %SystemName% – The emulator executable, usually MAME
  • Media
    • %SystemName%
      • Images – Wheel images for each game in the database
      • Sounds – Background music, scrolling sounds…
      • Themes – The theme for the system, this is a Zip file containing assets and information on where to show rom information or videos
      • Video – Short video of the game currently selected, usually mp4, avi or flv files.
    • Main Menu
      • Images – The wheel image for the system displayed in the main menu with all other systems
      • Sounds – Sounds when opening or exiting the system menu
      • Themes – The main menu theme for the system, this is a Zip file containing assets and information on where to show rom information or videos
      • Video – Short system video, usually the original release trailer or a compilation of a few games available on the system
  • Modules
    • %SystemName%.ahk – This is the script that launches the emulator, usually contains the rom path and a fullscreen parameter
  • Settings
    • %SystemName.ini% – The settings for HyperSpin
  • ROMS: Folder containing all ROM files, Sometimes this folder is located inside the emulator folder.

Database XML

This is the database which holds all the filenames and information for each ROM, It’s important that the names in this file are exactly the same as the ROM’s filenames(without the extension) or the game will not be found. The XML containing all the ROM names should also be in its own folder named exactly as your system name in Hyperspin. eg: Databases/Bally Astrocade/Bally Astrocade.xml

Emulator

This folder contains the emulator for the system. If the pack you downloaded does not contain an emulator, this usually means MAME is used to emulate the system and you can use the latest MAME version available on their website. When the emulator is included, this usually means MAME does not support that particular system. Different emulators require controller assignment and different startup parameters, I recommend using MAME if the system is supported in MAME. The startup parameters are quite hard to find but I included mine in this post.

Media

The media folder contains all images, sounds, and videos for Hyperspin. This way when you select a game, you get a preview image with some game assets. The media for the system should be inside a folder with the exact system name for Hyperspin to pick up the assets.

Module

The module file is a script that will launch the emulator, this script usually includes a -fullscreen parameter, a ROM path parameter and in the case of MAME it requires a parameter to tell what system we want to run the selected ROM on. The scripts you find online are usually too complicated and require libraries to be installed. I included most of my scripts in this post to download. I’m absolutely using the minimum script to run the games and should work for everyone. In some cases, the module file can be found in the RocketLauncher/Modules folder.

Settings

Settings.ini files contain the settings for each emulator. This usually consists of an emulator path, rompath, romextensions and a few more parameters on how to start the selected games and display its artwork. I recommend not using this file as in many cases the paths in these files are specific to the system of the creator of the media pack and won’t work for your setup. I recommend adding the system using the HyperHQ software which will create a clean INI file. Then add the ROM folder and Emulator path.

ROMS

The roms folder contains all ROM files. I recommend moving this folder onto a large secondary drive (not your Windows SSD) since this folder will grow quickly. I personally have an 8TB HDD for this folder which is about 7TB in size now. In some cases, the ROMS are located inside of the Emulators/%SystemName%/ROMS folder of the downloaded pack.

RocketLauncher

This folder can be ignored & deleted, RocketLauncher is an alternative for the Hyperlaunch which provides some more options. Using RocketLauncher is still a valid option but in my opinion, this adds more complexity to your already complex Hyperlaunch setup. I chose not to use it as it will require a lot more work to set everything up and adds another layer to your setup which also means another point of failure. I try to keep my setup as simple as possible.

Add a System

First, open HyperHQ.exe, click “Main Menu Wizard”. Click the green plus and type the name of the system you want to add (the name you give here will be referenced in this document with %SystemName%)

On the next screen, click yes since the wheel we’re adding will have a sub wheel (this sub wheel will load its content from the database XML)

Select one of your existing systems and click add before or after,

  • I recommend adding them in alphabetical order
  • Larger companies like Nintendo, atari with multiple systems, I usually prefixed with the company name (Nintendo Gameboy), this in combination with the previous hint will keep the systems a bit grouped by brand and will make it easier when you have to search a game console later.

Note: You can manually add systems by editing “Databases/Main Menu/Main Menu.xml”

Media

Adding Media:

Hyperspin will need media files to show your ROMs in a ‘fancy’ way, this is optional as HyperSpin will automatically show the ROM name in text but that’s not done.

  • Images
  • Sound
  • Themes
  • Video

These packs are widely available and usually contain all Media/Emulator/Roms ready for use. After extracting you will see a similar structure as your Hyperspin setup:

Official info

  • Media: All wheel media files per system
    • %System%
      • Images:
        • Artwork1-4: Depending on your theme Hyperspin will look in these folders for cd boxes, artwork,
        • Backgrounds:
        • Genre
          • Backgrounds
          • Wheel
        • Letters: When searching alphabetically, these are the letters Hyperspin will show
        • Other
          • Pointer.png: The pointer on the right side in the ROM wheel
        • Particle: Contains animation effects
        • Special: Contains joystick animations
        • Wheel: The image per ROM, must have the same name as the rom&database
      • Sound:
        • Background Music: Background music while in the ROM wheel
        • System Exit: Sound when exiting the wheel
        • System Start: Sound when entering the wheel
        • Wheel Sounds: Sounds when switching between roms
        • Wheel Click.mp3
      • Themes: Theme.zip per ROM, must have the same name as the Rom & Database
        • default.zip When no theme for the ROM is available, Hyperspin will take the default theme
      • Video: Video for the game (name must match rom&database)
        • Override Transitions: 
AHK Syntax

AHK Modules will launch each emulator with the correct parameters, these AHK modules are widely available on the internet and I added most of my own modules in this post so you should not have to write your own. But if you ever find one of the modules not fully working it can be useful to know to fix common issues. If you are somewhat familiar with programming, AHK or AutoHotKey uses a basic scripting language that can be used to automate windows. Below are a few basic features of AHK for you to thinker with. For a better tutorial, visit the AHK Beginners Tutorial Page Here.

Empty AHK File, Minimum Requirements

Adding this to the bottom of your AHK Module will close the emulator’s process when pressing ESC.

CloseProcess:
Process, Close, %executable%
return

IF Statement

if (romExtension = “.cue”)

{

    ;MsgBox A cue file will not load, opening first bin file

    RunWait, %executable% -f “%romPath%%romName% (Track 01).bin”, %emuPath%

}

else

{

    RunWait, %executable% -f “%romPath%%romName%%romExtension%”, %emuPath%

}

Messagebox

This will show a windows popup with an OK button, I use this to notify of any issues with the emulator or extra steps that are not as clear to get a game running.

 MsgBox Correct file found, launching

Comments

;

MAME System List

MAME is an all-in-one emulator supporting over 200 systems. There is no “official” system list for MAME but I found a WIKI page that has quite a big list of compatible systems however it is probably only 35% of compatible systems, I also made my own list including the parameter for selecting the correct emulator in MAME

  • Aamber Pegasus – pegasus
  • Acorn Electron – electron
  • Amstrad CPC – cpc664
  • Amstrad GX4000 – gx4000
  • APF Imagination Machine – apfimag
  • Apple II – apple2ep
  • Apple IIGS – apple2gs
  • Applied Technology MicroBee – mbeeic
  • Atari 8-Bit – a800
  • Atari 2600 – a2600
  • Atari 5200 – a5200
  • Atari 7800 – a7800
  • Atari Jaguar – jaguar
  • Atari Lynx – lynx
  • Bally Astrocade – astrocde
  • Bandai Super Vision 8000 – sv8000
  • Bandai WonderSwan – wswan
  • Bandai WonderSwan Color – wscolor
  • Bit Corporation Gamate – gamate
  • Camputers Lynx – lynx128k
  • Casio PV-1000 – pv1000
  • Casio PV-2000 – pv2000
  • Coleco ADAM – adam
  • ColecoVision – coleco
  • Commodore 64 – c64
  • Commodore MAX Machine – vic10
  • Creatronic Mega Duck – megaduck
  • EACA EG2000 Colour Genie – cgenie
  • Emerson Arcadia 2001 – arcadia
  • Entex Adventure Vision – advision
  • Epoch Game Pocket Computer – gamepock
  • Epoch Super Cassette Vision – scv
  • Exidy Sorcerer – sorcerer
  • Fairchild Channel F – channelf
  • Fujitsu FM-7 – fmnew7
  • Funtech Super Acan – supracan
  • GamePark 32 – gp32
  • GCE Vectrex – vectrex
  • Hartung Game Master – gmaster
  • Interton VC 4000 – vc4000
  • JungleTac Sport Vii – vii
  • Jupiter Ace – jupace
  • Magnavox Odyssey 2 – odyssey2
  • Matra & Hachette Alice – alice32
  • Mattel Aquarius – aquarius
  • Mattel Intellivision – intv
  • MGT Sam Coupe – samcoupe
  • Milton Bradley MicroVision – microvsn
  • NEC PC-8801 – pc8801
  • NEC PC Engine – pce
  • NEC PC Engine-CD – pce
  • NEC SuperGrafx – sgx
  • NEC TurboGrafx-16 – tg16
  • NEC TurboGrafx-CD – tg16
  • Nintendo 64 – n64
  • Nintendo 64DD – n64dd
  • Nintendo Entertainment System – nes
  • Nintendo Famicom – famicom
  • Nintendo Famicom Disk System – fds
  • Nintendo Game Boy – gameboy
  • Nintendo Game Boy Advance – gba
  • Nintendo Game Boy Color – gbcolor
  • Nintendo Pokemon Mini – pokemini
  • Nintendo Satellaview – snes
  • Nintendo Super Famicom – snes
  • Nintendo Super Game Boy – supergb
  • Nintendo Virtual Boy – vboy
  • Othello Multivision – omv1000
  • Philips CD-i – cdimono1
  • Philips Videopac Plus G7400 – g7400
  • Philips VG 5000 – vg5k
  • RCA Studio II – studio2
  • Sega 32X – 32x
  • Sega CD – segacd
  • Sega Game Gear – gamegear
  • Sega Genesis – genesis
  • Sega Master System – sms
  • Sega Mega Drive – megadriv
  • Sega Pico – pico
  • Sega Saturn – saturn
  • Sega SC-3000 – sc3000
  • Sega SG-1000 – sg1000
  • Sega VMU – svmu
  • Sharp X1 – x1turbo40
  • Sinclair ZX81 – zx81
  • SNK Neo Geo AES – aes
  • SNK Neo Geo CD – neocdz
  • SNK Neo Geo Pocket – ngp
  • SNK Neo Geo Pocket Color – ngpc
  • Sony PlayStation – psx
  • Sony PocketStation – pockstat
  • Sord M5 – m5
  • Soundic Victory MPT-02 – mpt02
  • Super Nintendo Entertainment System – snes
  • Tandy TRS-80 Color Computer – coco3
  • Texas Instruments TI 99-4A – ti99_4a
  • Tiger Game.com – gamecom
  • Tomy Tutor – tutor
  • VTech CreatiVision – crvision
  • Watara Supervision – svision

If anyone knows a complete list, please post a link in the comments below.

I uploaded my module folder to GitHub for anyone to use and update. The modules on this GitHub page include the used emulator and are as simple as possible to minimize points of failure.

This is the last part of the “DIY arcade cabinet” tutorials. I hope I helped you get your own arcade cabinet done. If there are any questions, feel free to leave a comment below any of the DIY arcade cabinet tutorials and I will respond as soon as possible.

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Arcade Cabinet – Setup Hyperspin & Controllers https://stevenbreuls.com/2019/09/arcade-cabinet-setup-hyperspin-controllers/ https://stevenbreuls.com/2019/09/arcade-cabinet-setup-hyperspin-controllers/#respond Fri, 06 Sep 2019 13:44:19 +0000 https://stevenbreuls.com/?p=4410 This part of the DIY Arcade guide will cover the installation and setup of the main software on your arcade. This includes: Setting up windows, configuring your USB Controllers, Installing and configuring the Front-End and much more. DIY Arcade Guides Introduction & Design Building the Cabinet Building the Control Panel Installing & Wiring Cabinet Electronics […]

The post Arcade Cabinet – Setup Hyperspin & Controllers appeared first on Steven B..

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This part of the DIY Arcade guide will cover the installation and setup of the main software on your arcade. This includes: Setting up windows, configuring your USB Controllers, Installing and configuring the Front-End and much more.

DIY Arcade Guides
Introduction & Design
Building the Cabinet
Building the Control Panel
Installing & Wiring Cabinet Electronics
Setup Hyperspin & Controllers
Installing Emulators & Games
Photo Album

 

This arcade cabinet is still a work in progress, the guides are not done yet, updates coming soon.

Requirements

  • Windows 10 installed & fully updated
  • USB Mouse & Keyboard
  • USB HUB and All USB controllers connected
  • Register an account @ http://hyperspin-fe.com/
Setup Windows

As we will be using a dedicated computer I would recommend using the computer only for Hyperspin so the best way to start is with a clean windows 10 installation, I went with windows 10 and so far no issues at all.

Install windows Required programs:

I will be to using windows 10 for my build, I recommend keeping the software on this computer as minimal as possible.

Disable windows UAC

  • Windows 10: Control Panel -> User Accounts -> Settings for UAC -> drag the slider down and apply

Updates

I recommend updating to the latest version, then install all your software and turn off windows update completely. You don’t want windows to update to randomly ruin your setup with no clue to start looking. I also advise staying away from updates as long as you are not having troubles with your current version. A few solutions to disable windows 10 updates are described on This website.

⚠ Remember the “October 2018” update which randomly deleted important files for no reason. it eventually took Microsoft over 5 months for this update to be re-released. gotta love Microsoft! but since the software only works on windows, no use for Mac or Linux here 🙁

Empty desktop

I recommend using a black wallpaper without any icons on your desktop and autohiding the start menu. This will make the machine look more professional during startup.

 Anti Virus

I don’t recommend using an antivirus, I used AVG in my first setup which managed to destroy my complete setup due to removing false positive files. The preinstalled windows defender seems to have less of a problem with these programs but I still disabled the “real-time scanning/protection” option. The last thing you want is it to delete necessary files corrupting your setup.

Backups

I also recommend creating regular backups of your setup. You could create a zip of your hyperspin installation folder but I recommend creating a full disk image of your C drive when you are completely done. This way you can restore the complete drive including the windows installation and all it’s settings.

Install Front-End + LEDBlinky

Your Hyperspin installation folder should be as short as possible, preferably C:/Hyperspin/HyperSpin.exe, this will prevent problems with file paths longer than 255 characters. just extract the 1.4 archives in your folder.

This will be a basic Hyperspin package containing some basic systems but without any roms or media.

This may seem overwhelming at first but you get familiar very quickly as Hyperspin is very logical.

  • Root Folder: Keep the path to this folder as short as possible
    • Databases: Contains a database with all games per system
      • %System%:
        • %System%.xml: List of all available roms, the exact ROM filename is required
        • favorites.txt: List of games that were favorited
      • Main Menu
        • Main Menu.xml: Contains systems, edit to add or change systems order
    • Emulators: Folder with al emulator software
      • %System%: The emulator for %SYSTEM%
    • LEDBlinky: The root folder for LEDBlink.exe
    • Media: Game-wheel media files per system
      • %System%
        • Images: Backgrounds, Wheel image, Artwork…
        • Sound: Background Music, Wheel sounds, System Start/exit sounds
        • Themes: The main UI for the selected system
        • Video: Preview Video’s for each game
    • Roms: Roms folder, I recommend moving this to a large external drive
      • %System%
        • Roms
    • Modules:
      • %System%
        • %System%.ahk: Script for launching a specific emulator
    • Settings: The HyperHQ settings file per machine
      • %System%.ini: Configuration for system

Optionally you can have your Roms and video’s stored on a different folder/partition/drive, these folders are not obligatory but are recommended for these guides

** HyperHQ.exe: on windows 10 you need to run as administrator and run in Windows XP compatibility mode, this will prevent browse file windows from crashing (may still happen sometimes). If HyperHQ still won’t start, check windows task manager if it’s not still running due to an error in the closing process.

Configure IPAC controllers

To configure our IPAC controllers we need the configuration utility from the Ultimark website.

When installed, launch the tool. If you have more than 1 controllar attached, the utilitty will presumably randomly choose one of the devices. If you want to configure the second controller unplug the first and restart the applicaiton. It should automatically select the second controller now.

In here you can assign a keyboard key to each of the inputs. It also has a “shift” option which in combination which the shift key, it can have a secondary key assigned although I did not use the shift function and instead cleared all the shift assignments. Below is my personal mapping table for my control panel. This will be different for your setup so don’t just blindly copy these keys.

After completing your mapping, I recommend Saving (File-Save As) the mapping to your HDD in case the controller loses its settings or you accidentally reset the board from within the utility.

Configure PACLed with LEDBlinky

The PACLED64 itself does not need many configurations. The only thing you should configure is the “Power on Status”. This is just what LEDs should turn on if the board is powered but not controlled over the USB cable. You want all the LEDs to turn on even when your computer is off. This can be done by downloading and opening the PACLED64 configuration utility and selecting “Start recording script to Flash”

Then Open the “Brightness” Tab, set LED number to 0 and slide the Brightness slider to the right. Then click Apply.

Now go back to the settings tab and “Stop recording Script to Flash”. Then hit RunScript to check if all the LEDS turn on. This is the script that will run whenever the PACLED64 is powered.

When your power on script is recorded and working correctly (turn off and on the main power). Then Download and install LEDBLinky by copying the LEDBlinky folder to the root of your Hyperspin Folder, LEDBlinky is not free but I highly recommend purchasing the software as it’s the by far the best tool out there for controlling your LEDs

Before we can use LEDBlinky to create animations, we need to generate an input map. This input map defines the relationship between each wired port on your led controllers and the keyboard input code for that button. Open the LEDBLinky folder and run the “GenerateInputMap.exe” utility. Then for each port on the PACLED64, assign a port label and input code. The LED type should be ‘single’ unless you are using RGB button LED’s.

When all button LEDs and Input codes are set, hit Save in the top left corner. Then close the app and launch “LEDBlinkyConfig.exe”. Then Create your first “startup” animation. This animation will be run whenever Hyperspin is started. This process may be confusing at first so I found this video from Laverick’s Arcade explaining all steps in detail. For my start-up animation, I deviced my control panel in 6 horizontal rows which will slowly turn on during the Front-End startup video.

When you created your first animation, open the LEDBlinky configuration utility and open the “FE Options” tab. Then for the “FE Startup animation” select your newly created animation from the dropdown list. You can hit Test to comfirm it’s the correct animation.

After you created a “startup” animation you need to create a “Full On” animation which will make control panel light up permanently while browsing your games in Hyperspin. Follow the same process as your startup animation but this time, create only 1 frame with all the LEDs on.

Now open the “Settings” utility and select your script on the following tabs, also make sure LEDBlinky runs on boot.

(Image Soon)

Install AutoHotkey

Hyperspin can use AutoHotkey to launch emulators which I highly recommend. This way you have more control over how your emulator should start (fullscreen, autoload, skip boot…). Autohotkey can be Downloaded from their Website. I recommend downloading the current version.

There is no configuration required, the AutoHotkey installation is now done

Personal mapping

This is my personal controller mapping, I recommend creating a table for your own control panel. The mapping will be different for each cabinet so don’t just blindly copy my configuration.

Real ControlPanel Button

iPac indication

Keyboard equivalent

PACLed Equivalent

1 Joystick UP

1RIGHT

PG UP

38

1 Joystick LEFT

1LEFT

INSERT

38

1 Joystick RIGHT

1UP

NUM /

38

1 Joystick DOWN

1DOWN

NUM *

38

Button 1

1SW1

NUM +

37

Button 2

1SW4

EQUAL =

32

Button 3

1SW2

SPACE

34

Button 4

1SW3

[

35

Button 5

1SW5

]

36

Button 6

1SW8

. (Period)

33

Start

1SW6

, (Comma)

31

Select

1START

‘ (Grave)

40

Coin

1SW7

‘ (Appostrophe)

39

2 Joystick UP

2UP

UP

51

2 Joystick LEFT

2LEFT

LEFT

51

2 Joystick RIGHT

2RIGHT

RIGHT

51

2 Joystick DOWN

2DOWN

DOWN

51

Button 1

2SW4

1

47

Button 2

2SW7

2

56

Button 3

2SW5

3

57

Button 4

1COIN

4

49

Button 5

2SW8

5

55

Button 6

2SW3

6

54

Button 7

2SW6

7

53

Button 8

2START

8

48

Start

2COIN

9

52

Select

2SW1

0

50

Coin

2SW2

46

3 Joystick UP

3RIGHT

HOME

3

3 Joystick LEFT

3DOWN

DEL

3

3 Joystick RIGHT

3LEFT

PG DN

3

3 Joystick DOWN

3UP

END

3

Button 1

3SW2

A

9

Button 2

3SW3

B

7

Button 3

3COIN

C

4

Button 4

3SW4

D

2

Button 5

3SW1

E

8

Button 6

3SW8

F

1

Button 7

4COIN

G

10

Button 8

3SW7

H

6

Start

3SW6

I

11

Select

3START

J

12

Coin

3SW5

K

5

4 Joystick UP

4DOWN

L

17

4 Joystick LEFT

4RIGHT

M

17

4 Joystick RIGHT

4UP

N

17

4 Joystick DOWN

4LEFT

O

17

Button 1

4SW7

P

21

Button 2

4SW4

Q

27

Button 3

4SW6

R

24

Button 4

4SW3

S

26

Button 5

4SW5

T

23

Button 6

4SW2

U

25

Start

4SW1

V

19

Select

4SW8

W

22

Coin

4START

X

20

P1 Upper 1

1SW4

F1

11

P1 Upper 2

1SW1

F2

8

P2 Upper 1

1SW7

F3

4

P2 Upper 2

1SW3

F4

2

Center 1

1DOWN

F5

12

Center 2

1SW6

Vol Down

7

Center 3

1LEFT

Vol UP

6

Center 4 (Exit Game)

1SW2

ESC

10

P3 Upper 1

1SW5

F9

9

P3 Upper 2

1RIGHT

F10

5

P4 Upper 1

1UP

F11

3

P4 Upper 2

1SW8

F12

1

Mouse Left

2SW3

MOUSE Left

61

Mouse Middle

2SW1

MOUSE Middle

62

Mouse Right

2SW2

Mouse Right

63

Coin Door 1

48

Coin Door 2

47

Coin Door 3

46

Coin Door 4

49

Make sure to keep the backups of your mappings safe in case of accidental reset or in case one of the controllers dies you can just replace the controller and load in your mapping without having to spend hours remapping everything.

Hyperspin settings

For initial setup, launch HyperHQ.exe, this is the settings tool for HyperSpin. I posted my personal settings below, but I recommend trying some settings to tweak hyperspin to your liking.

(Images will be updated soon)

Install & Configure MAME

MAME is the main emulator used in Hyperspin setups because it emulates over 200+ systems. MAME is free to use and can be downloaded Here. Install MAME in C:/Hyperspin/Emulators/MAME.

After the installation is complete, navigate to your install directory and run “MAME64.exe”. When the UI has loaded, click “Configure Options”

Then select “General Inputs”

In here you can set the controls for each player, make sure to hit delete first to remove any of the previous values. MAME has a huge list of controls, probably more than there are buttons on your control panel so delete any mapped controls you will not use.

Do this for all players. If you have a ultimark aimtrak gun, the following video by Maverick’s Arcade will show how to setup your lightgun to work in MAME.

Useful Tools

There are a lot of useful tools created by individual developers to extend Hyperspin Functionality. These tools will save you a lot of time having to manually edit databases or filenames.

Hypert00ls – This is a fully-featured configuration tool for your game libraries, this tool allows for batch renaming of roms or database entries, auto-match artwork, backups as well as an audit tool to search and find missing roms/media…

Dir2XML (by fata1err0r) – Will create a Database from a given folder, This is useful when having a list of roms and you don’t want to create a database manually for each of the files.

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Arcade Cabinet – Installing & Wiring Cabinet Electronics https://stevenbreuls.com/2019/09/arcade-cabinet-installing-wiring-cabinet-electronics/ https://stevenbreuls.com/2019/09/arcade-cabinet-installing-wiring-cabinet-electronics/#respond Wed, 04 Sep 2019 21:55:47 +0000 https://stevenbreuls.com/?p=6731 In this part, I will install the electronics in the main cabinet. this includes the computer, speakers, cabinet lighting, coin doors, in cabinet lighting, fans, power supplies, USB hub… DIY Arcade Guides Introduction & Design Building the Cabinet Building the Control Panel Installing & Wiring Cabinet Electronics Setup Hyperspin & Controllers Installing Emulators & Games […]

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In this part, I will install the electronics in the main cabinet. this includes the computer, speakers, cabinet lighting, coin doors, in cabinet lighting, fans, power supplies, USB hub…

DIY Arcade Guides
Introduction & Design
Building the Cabinet
Building the Control Panel
Installing & Wiring Cabinet Electronics
Setup Hyperspin & Controllers
Installing Emulators & Games
Photo Album

 

This arcade cabinet is still a work in progress, the guides are not done yet, updates coming soon.

Requirements

Tools:

  • Drill
  • Zip ties
  • HotGlue
  • Double Sided Tape

Provide Power in your Cabinet

To provide power in the cabinet, first install and wire the power connector with fuse & switch. The folowing video will explain the wiring in detail

Then get your power strip and cut off its wall plug. Then attach clamps on each of the 3 loose wires and attach them to the chassis connector you installed and wired before.

Then mount the power strip somewhere centered in your cabinet

(Photo Soon)

Installing Sound System(s)

For my cabinet, I will use 2 separate audio systems, one is an old Logitech Z2300 2.1 400W set which will be used to provide bass and the two front firing speakers in the kickplate and two car speakers that will be mounted above the screen… The subwoofer was mounted using l-hooks.

Then to mount the car speakers in the top of the cabinet, I mounted the power supply using zip ties to the back of the marquee, then I mounted the amplifier onto the speaker board using the white PCB feet. then the speakers were installed.

The speakers are connected to the amplifier, the amplifier is powered by the 36V 400W PSU. To power the PSU, I cut off the end of an IEC (pc power) cable and attached the loose wires onto the correct terminals on the power supply. Then the plug was inserted in the power strip I installed earlier.

Then I mounted my volume knob module onto the left side of my cabinet using the white PCB feet, the volume module requires 5V to operate so I found a spare adapter which fits just fine. To split the sound coming from your computer to both of the sound systems, I used simple passive RCA splitter cables like THESE to split the signal just after the volume control module so the volume stays the same for both systems.

Installing Computer

To install the computer inside of the cabinet, I used the PCB feet to secure the motherboard onto the bottom panel of the cabinet.

(Photo Soon)

Then I stuck the Power supply to the back of my cabinet using double sided tape, the hard drive was mounted using L clamps.

then I wired up the motherboard, installed the GPU and added the boot drive SSD.

Installing & Wiring Coin doors

First, assemble the coin door by securing the lock in place. All coin doors came with a mounting bracket and screws and a LED to light up the price tag. To install the LED doors in the previously cut holes, screw the hooks onto the back of the doors.

Now the coin doors are installed, We need to wire the LEDs. I have a lot of unused pins on my pacLED (the one that’s used for the cabinet part of the control panel) I added another terminal from this pacled on the bottom of the center cabinet plate, then wired the LEDs onto this terminal by soldering the cables onto the bulb holder.

Now the coin doors can be controlled over USB, say only 2 players are playing, you could only choose to light the two corresponding coin doors

(Image Soon)

Cabinet RGB Lighting & marquee lights

RGB Cabinet Lighting

For the RGB cabinet lighting, I will use 144L/M RGB led strips mounted on the back of the cabinet. these will be controlled by a controller that comes with a remote. The strips will be powered using a dedicated 12V power supply. I first mounted the power supply in the bottom of the cabinet.

Then I mounted the controller to the inside of my cabinet and connected the + and -12V wires using some old speaker wire.

I used one of the 12P terminals to attach multiple strips to the output of the LED strip controller.

Then soldered wires onto the left and right led strip and connected these to this terminal

(Photo Soon)

Marquee

For lighting the marquee, I ordered a  2,5meter 12V White LED strip. This strip can be connected directly to the 12V power sypply. To feed the wires trough to the front of the marquee, i drilled a small hole.

Install TV

More info soon

Other Electronics

Power Strip

To provide power in your cabinet, I used a 10 socket power strip which I stuck in the center of my cabinet using strong double-sided tape.

Power Switch

I bought a “chassis power connector with fuse and switch” which I will use to power my cabinet. first, cut off the wall plug of your previously installed power strip and wire it onto the chassis connector as follows

Fans

To keep the internals cool, I added 2x 120mm 12V PC Case fans I had laying around. Since these fans are PWM controlled and usually come with 3 or 4 wires. Converting these fans to work on 12V full power. I first drew a 120mm circle on the panels and then used the hand jigsaw to cut out the hole.

One blowing in from the bottom and one blowing hot air out on the top. Both fans were covered using the included fan grills. Both were installed using regular screws.

USB Hub

I used a powered 10 port USB 3.0 Hub to connect all my USB controllers and other peripherals to. I used double sided tape to stick the HUB to the side of the cabinet. The power adapter is plugged in the Powerstrip I installed earlier.

RJ45 Chassis Connector

I ordered a Neutric RJ45 chassis passthrough connector, I used the same drill that was used for the smaller arcade buttons and used screws to secure it in place. On the inside, I ran a Gigabit ethernet cable from this connector to the computers Network port.

External PC Power Button

My motherboard has a power button on it but we want to turn on and off the arcade computer without opening the cabinet. so I added a small momentary push button to the rear of the machine that will act as the power button for my computer. I used some breadboard test wires and soldered on both terminals of the button.

(Photo Soon)

These connectors will plug in directly onto the motherboard front panel connectors. make sure to plug it in the correct pins. the correct wiring should be shown in the manual of your motherboard

Microphone

LEDBlinky and some games can use a microphone to react to sound or music. I had a cheap microphone laying around which I stuck to the bottom of the center plate facing out to the front of my cabinet.

The 3.5mm jack was plugged in the RED 3,5mm plug on the motherboard.

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